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John Lodge, The Peerage of Ireland, or a Genealogical History of the Present Nobility of that Kingdom. 1754 John Lodge, The Peerage of Ireland, or a Genealogical History of the Present Nobility of that Kingdom. 1754

Ref: IE0105
ISBN: 1-84630-300-1

First published in 1754 and republished here on fully-searchable CD-Rom is John Lodge's monumental The Peerage of Ireland. Published in four volumes and containing more than 1,600 pages is rightly viewed as the 'first great printed collection of Irish pedigrees and family history, in which a high degree of reliance may be made', according to Burke's Peerage. Revised and republished in 1798, Lodge's work was for Ireland what Dugdale and Collins were to England and his original work is still widely used by genealogists and historians.

John Lodge was born at Holton in Lancashire, the son of a farmer. Educated at St. John's College, Cambridge, he graduated B. A., and M.A., in 1719. Settling in Dublin before 1744 he was residing at Abbey Street in 1751. Appointed Deputy-Keeper of the Records of Bermigham Town, Dublin Castle. He later became Deputy-Clerk and Deputy Keeper or the Rolls and Deputy Registrar of the Court Prerogative. He died in Bath, Somerset, in 1774, having married twice and having issuing of nine children only one of who, William (1742-1813) survived. William became Chancellor of Armagh Cathedral and it was to Armagh Library that John Lodge's books and papers can now be found.

It was while filling the post as Deputy-Keeper of the Records of Bermigham Tower that Lodge began collating notes from the Patent Rolls that he had readily at his disposal. In addition to numerous other manuscript sources - public and private - earlier published pedigrees and 'personal information' all of these found their way into Lodge's lasting legacy: The Peerage of Ireland, or A Genealogical History of the Present Nobility of that Kingdom. With Engravings of their Paternal Coats of Arms. Collected from the Public Records; Authentic Manuscripts; Approved Historians; Well-attested Pedigrees; and Personal Information. Lodge's original notes were made in cipher, which baffled later authors who wished to revise Lodge's work, including Mervyn Archdall, who was about to give up his task until the key to the cipher was discovered by his wife. The result was Archdall's seven-volume revision of Lodge's work, published in 1789.

Containing information not only on the ennobled families of Ireland, Lodge supplied a huge amount of detail on collateral branches often far removed from the removed from the original stock and even gave information on families related simply through marriage. Virtually all of the records used by Lodge were subsequently destroyed in the Four Courts Fire of 1922 and it is to Lodge and his successor, Sir William Betham, that a huge debts of gratitude must be paid for virtually everything that is now known of Prerogative Court and Consistorial Courts in Ireland is down to the tireless transcriptions.

John Lodge's Peerage of Ireland remains a much sought after publication and this CD-Rom republication is a chance to own perhaps the pre-eminent publication on the pedigrees of the Irish peerage collateral families and is not to be missed. 


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Phillimore's Pedigree Work: A Handbook for the Genealogist, 1914 FREE DOWNLOAD Phillimore's Pedigree Work: A Handbook for the Genealogist, 1914 FREE DOWNLOAD

Ref: IE5010
ISBN: 1-84630-154-8

This booklet was written by the famous English genealogist, W.P.W Phillimore, as an introduction to the beginner embarking on their family history. It is full of very sensible advice and cautionary tales. He warns against the errors that exist in the pedigrees that had already been compiled, and makes the important point that this is rarely because of fabrication, but because of "inability to appreciate the rules of evidence". In other words those who are not trained in the work are inevitably going to make mistakes, and his aim in this little book is to help students identify and understand the nature of the evidence they use. "Verify your references" is a repeated maxim, as true then as it is today.

But the booklet has so much more, from how to layout and print your pedigree, to the principal sources and the problems attached to each. He looks in detail at English sources, while also addressing Scottish and Irish. Those familiar with Irish genealogy will be struck by his description of sources and options no longer available, his comment "Ireland is fortunate in preserving more of her census returns than England" reminds us how much has changed since 1914.

All in all, this is a great introduction to family history as well as the historical methods of the genealogist.

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Matheson's Special Report On Surnames in Ireland (1894) Matheson's Special Report On Surnames in Ireland (1894)

Ref: IET0047
ISBN: 1-84630-052-5
Number of Pages: 76
File Size: 133 Mb
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Published by the General Register Office, this study is the first detailed official work on surnames in Ireland. Sir Robert E. Matheson used the 1890 birth registers to compile an authoritative list of surnames and their frequency and distribution throughout the country. He begins with a list of the 100 most common surnames in the country in order of frequency, and then compares this against those in England and Scotland. This book includes a detailed account of the derivation and ethnology of Irish names, tracing each wave of migration from the Celts and Vikings through to the migration of Russian and Polish Jews in the 1880s.

Matheson then lists the main surnames (and numbers of births) for each county, following which he provides a fascinating look at the continued local concentrations of many surnames.

Thereafter the book contains extensive tables of the distribution of over 2,600 surnames in Ireland. These tables give the numbers of births in 1890, and the counties and provinces where these births were recorded.

This publication contains the first edition of this work published in 1894.

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Bernard Burke, A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland, 1863 Bernard Burke, A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland, 1863

Ref: IE0101
ISBN: 1-84630-292-7

Republished here on fully-searchable CD-Rom is the 1863 4th edition of Burke's Land Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland. Carrying the full-title A Genealogical & Heraldic Dictionary of the Land Gentry of Great Britain & Ireland by Sir John Bernard Burke. Published in two parts, the Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland contains more than 1,700 printed pages

Sir John Bernard Burke (1814-1892) was born in London, the son of John Burke (1787-1848) and educated in France. Like his father, Sir John was first and foremost a genealogist. In 1826 John Burke issued the first edition of a Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Peerage and Baronetage of the United Kingdom. From 1847 to the present day this has been published regularly and is generally known as Burke's Peerage. After his father's death Sir John took control of his father's publications and issued for the first time The Royal Families of England, Scotland, and Wales, with their Descendants. In 1853 Burke was appointed Ulster King at Arms and was knighted the following year. After his appointment as Keeper of the State Papers of Ireland, Burke moved to Dublin and eventually died there in 1892.

In addition to his editorial work on Burke's Peerage, Sir John also issued a number of companion volumes of this flagship publication, which included the Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland, while also continuing his father's Dictionary of the Peerages of England, Scotland and Ireland, extinct, dormant and in abeyance. Integral to Burke's study of armorial bearings was his 1878 publication Encyclopaedia of Heraldry, or General Armoury of England, Scotland and Ireland. In addition to these works, Burke is credited with a number of publications in his own right, rather than as general editor. These included The Roll of Battle Abbey (1848); The Romance of the Aristocracy (1855); The Romance of the Forum (185-); The Rise of Great Families (1882) and the Vicissitudes of Families (1860). At the time of his death Burke was succeeded as editor of Burke's Peerage by his fourth son, Ashworth Peter Burke and another son, Sir Henry Farnham Burke, would eventually rise to the position of Garter Principal King of Arms.

First published by John Burke in 1826 under the title A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland, enjoying territorial possessions or high official rank, or Burke's Commoners for short. By the time of the publication of the second edition the less than flattering title of 'commoner' was replaced by the phrase 'landed gentry'. Included in the Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland were all families of consequence that were not entitled to be included in Burke's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, although some of the families did appear in both publications and as such these were, initially at least, the landowning upper-class who came to identify and adopt the phrase 'Landed Gentry' first coined by Burke. Subsequent editions of the Land Gentry came to include aspiring wealthy families from the middle classes, such as merchants and those from the professions.

Providing sometimes-detailed genealogies on collateral lines, junior branches of families and in-laws, Land Gentry provides details on male lineage, seats, arms, crests and mottoes for thousands of families and as such remains an indispensable genealogical and historical source and remains one of Burke's flagship publications to this day. 


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Burke's Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1899 Burke's Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1899

Ref: IET0039
ISBN: 1-84630-045-2
Number of Pages: 574
File Size: 386 Mb
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This was the first specifically Irish edition of Burke’s Landed Gentry, and is considerably more detailed on Irish families than what had appeared in previous years in the general British series. It contains detailed genealogies of all the ‘landed gentry’ in Ireland. This group represents the Irish landowners, and those aspiring to this status from among the merchant and professional community. But the value of this source is not just for this narrow group, as the genealogies are extensive, covering all collateral lines, junior branches and in-laws, many of whom would have been of more modest means.

The genealogies recorded were overwhelming those developed by the Ulster King of Arms (the Chief Herald in nineteenth century Ireland) and are quite valuable and largely reliable. As a source it is important for all those studying Irish genealogy, especially those whose ancestors were part of this social class.

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Sir Bernard Burke, Vicissitudes of Families, 1860 Sir Bernard Burke, Vicissitudes of Families, 1860

Ref: IE5109
ISBN: 1-84630-551-9
Number of Pages: 440
File Size: 15 Mb
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First published in London in 1860 is the first edition of Sir John Bernard Burke's Vicissitudes of Families. Containing some 440 printed pages, this publication charts the rise and often fall of some of the most noted families of Europe and especially Ireland and the vicissitudes that caused these changes in circumstance.

Sir John Bernard Burke (1814-1892) was born in London, the son of John Burke (1787-1848) and educated in France. Like his father, Sir John was first and foremost a genealogist. In 1826 John Burke issued the first edition of a Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Peerage and Baronetage of the United Kingdom. From 1847 to the present day this has been published annually and is generally known as Burke's Peerage. After his father's death Sir John took control of his father's publications and issued for the first time The Royal Families of England, Scotland, and Wales, with their Descendants. In 1853Burke moved he was appointed Ulster King at Arms and was knighted the following year. After his appointment as Keeper of the State Papers of Ireland, Burke moved to Dublin and eventually died there in 1892.

In addition to his editorial work on Burke's Peerage, Sir John also issued a number of companion volumes of this flagship publication, including the Landed Gentry of England and later for Ireland, while also continuing his father's Dictionary of the Peerages of England, Scotland and Ireland, extinct, dormant and in abeyance. Integral to Burke's study of armorists was his 1878 publication Encyclopaedia of Heraldry, or General Armoury of England, Scotland and Ireland. In addition to these works, Burke is credited with a number of publications in his own right, rather than as general editor. These included The Roll of Battle Abbey (1848); The Romance of the Aristocracy (1855); The Romance of the Forum (185-); The Rise of Great Families (1882) and the Vicissitudes of Families (1860). At the time of his death Burke was succeeded as editor of Burke's Peerage by his fourth son, Ashworth Peter Burke and another son, Sir Henry Farnham Burke, would eventually rise to the position of Garter Principal King of Arms.

Vicissitudes of Families details the vagaries of personality, events and history that led to the rise, but in most instances the fall of a number of celebrated families, some titled, some ennobled and some mere commoners. In his preface, Burke remarks that the vicissitudes experienced by what could be called the 'old aristocracy' could hardly, if ever, be separated from the national history of the country. In other cases the vicissitudes of families was often created by instability of mind or by the inheritance of an illegitimate issue or more commonly by lack of issue altogether. Burke illustrates these causes of vicissitude by choosing nineteen cases where families experienced huge changes in fortune. Numbered amongst these are the French Bonapartes, the bodice maker of Bristol and and the Lairds of Westquarter. However, it was to Ireland that much of Burke's attention was drawn with chapters on the exiled O'Donnells, the Clan MacCarthy, the Desmonds and the Kings of Meath, the O'Melaghlins.

Sometimes sad, always entertaining and not a little surprising in places, the Vicissitudes of Families makes for highly entertaining reading.

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Rev. Woulfe, Sloinnte Gaedheal is Gall: Irish names and surnames (1923) Rev. Woulfe, Sloinnte Gaedheal is Gall: Irish names and surnames (1923)

Ref: IE0014
ISBN: 1-84630-018-5
Number of Pages: 743
File Size: 34 Mb
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This important book was the result of 25 years of tireless research by Rev. Woulfe throughout Ireland and in England and Scotland. In it he gathers together the overwhelming majority of Irish forenames and surnames, together with explanatory notes and some history. Most importantly he explains the meanings and origins of Irish first names and surnames, as well as showing their Irish and/or English translations.

Divided into several sections:

General information, including a table of Irish letters

The Irish name system

Names of men (English-Irish)

Names of Women (English-Irish)

Surnames (English-Irish)

Names of men (Irish-English)

Names of women (Irish-English)

Surnames (Irish-English)

Clan names

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O'Hart's Irish & Anglo-Irish Landed Gentry O'Hart's Irish & Anglo-Irish Landed Gentry

Ref: IE0015
ISBN: 1-84630-032-0
Number of Pages: 792
File Size: 79 Mb
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This is one of O'Hart's main publications of family pedigrees from Ireland. In this volume he focuses mainly on families who settled in Ireland from Britain from the medieval period up to the 19th century. This volume contains 231 pedigrees of individual families, dating from as early as the 12th century up to the year of publication (1884).

The book also contains copious appendices of historic documents. Many of these deal with the Cromwellian period, including the transplantation to Connaught and the Commonwealth soldiers. There are further records concerning other land settlements from the 17th century, Irishmen serving in continental European armies, and much more besides. 



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Peerages of England Scotland & Ireland 1790 Peerages of England Scotland & Ireland 1790

Ref: 0472i
ISBN:

A wonderful little leather bound book published in 1790 that lists all of the Peerages of England Scotland & Ireland. Many coats of arms illustrated (mainly of the most important families). 


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Debrett's Peerage - Scotland & Ireland 1825 Debrett's Peerage - Scotland & Ireland 1825

Ref: 0473
ISBN:

An excellent reference book of 1825 listing and describing all of the peerages in Scotland and Ireland. 


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Joseph Gough Nichols, The Topographer and Genealogist (3 Vols) 1846-1858 Joseph Gough Nichols, The Topographer and Genealogist (3 Vols) 1846-1858

Ref: IE5048
ISBN: 1-84630-221-8

Originally published between 1846 and 1858 and republished here on fully-searchable CD-Rom is the three-volume collection The Topographer and Genealogist. Edited by John Gough Nichols and printed in London by the editor's father, John Bowyer Nichols, in total this monumental collection of historical and genealogical material contains more than 1,800 printed pages.

John Gough Nichols was the third generation of renowned London printers, publishers and antiquaries. His grandfather, John Nichols (1745-1826), began life as a printer, but by 1788 was the editor of the Gentleman's Magazine and published in eight volumes (1795-1815) The History and Antiquities of the County of Leicester, the most comprehensive antiquarian survey until that time ever undertaken. Together with Abraham Farley, Nichols proofed and printed the 1783 edition of the Doomsday Book as well as other antiquarian publications. John Gough Nichols' father, John Bowyer Nichols continued the family printing business, while his eldest son, John Gough Nichols is seen as his grandfather's natural successor.

John Gough Nichols joined the family printing firm in 1824 and, though his prodigious editorial achievements and biographical studies, may be regarded as the natural successor of his grandfather, John Nichols. He began to attend meetings of the Society of Antiquaries with his father from the age of twelve and, in 1826, assisted John Nichols with his Progresses of James I, completing it alone in 1828. His indefatigable editorship of the Gentleman's Magazine lasted from 1826 to its sale in 1856 but, through his zeal to print original sources and biographical materials, he was also the founding editor of the Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica (1834-1843), the Topographer and Genealogist (1846-1858), the Herald and Genealogist (1863-1874) and the Register and Magazine of Biography (1869) and was also one of the founding members of the Camden Society. o these milestones of biography and local historical publication must be added his Annals and Antiquities of Lacock Abbey in 1834, his contributions to Sir Richard Hoare's History of Modern Wiltshire and his contributions to Archæologia and the publications of the Camden Society, Surtees Society and Shakespeare Society, all of which he had helped to found. When he died, in 1873, his library at Holmwood Park near Dorking in Surrey housed one of the largest collections of topographical and historical books of his time. It was also the home of many thousands of family, business and collected papers that he and his family had been accumulating for over a century. In the course of the next fifty years a succession of sales by Sotheby's began the dispersal of the Nichols archive to its many present locations in public repositories and private collections around the world.

As for the three-volume publication, The Topographer and Genealogist, this contains a plethora of material gathered from numerous sources, such as monumental inscription, estates records, parochial records, leases, family chronicles and wills, as well as work undertaken by much earlier genealogists such as the herald, Peter Le Neve as well as records from various shires and hundreds of England and Ireland. It was Nichols' express wish that The Topographer and Genealogist should be a forum for the publication of detached essays on topography and genealogy bringing to the public attention hitherto lost relics while at the same time preserving these for posterity and in this Nichols was surely successful. 


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Hanna's The Scotch-Irish Hanna's The Scotch-Irish

Ref: IET0061
ISBN: 1-84630-080-0
Number of Pages: 1,244
File Size: 80 Mb
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Charles Hanna's "The Scotch-Irish, or the Scot in North Britain, North Ireland, and North America" is a vital source for anyone interested in the history of the involvement of Scottish settlers in Ireland or North America. Published in two volumes in 1902, and running to more than 1,200 pages, this resource is packed with details on the origin and migration of Scottish people over the course of twelve centuries. The author did not intent to produce a history of the Scotch-Irish people, as 'such a work would require more time and labor than have been expended upon the present undertaking' (vol. i, p. v). Nonetheless, Hanna succeeded in providing an impressive, lucid and readable account of the principal developments in Scottish, Irish and American history and Scots Irish influenced philosophical thought until the end of the seventeenth century.

Volume one of Hanna's work focuses on Scotland and Ireland, and there is little that is not detailed. The plantations of the early seventeenth century, both the private plantations of Antrim and Down, and the state backed settlement of the west-Ulster counties, receive fulsome treatment. Researchers will particularly appreciate that Hanna quotes extensively from source material that can now be difficult to obtain, including George Hill's Plantation of Ulster, Nicholas Pynnar's 1619 survey on the progress of the plantation and from various accounts in the State papers. The development of an organised Presbyterian church during the 1640s is also recounted, and readers unfamiliar with this ecclesiastical development will learn that 'on the 10th of June, 1642, the first regular presbytery of the Church in Ireland was constituted at Carrickfergus' (vol. i, p. 567), and that state payment to Presbyterian ministers, the 'regium donum', commenced in 1672 (vol. i, p. 580). The Williamite Revolution, which included the siege of Derry and the Protestant victory at Enniskillen, also receives extensive treatment (vol. i, pp 582-603).

In volume two, Hanna shifts the focus to North America, and concentrates on the development of Scottish settlements in New England and along the eastern seaboard during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Early censuses and surveys are transcribed, which will assist researchers interested in the development of Scots Irish settlement at this juncture (vol. ii, pp 94-130). Extensive appendices provide important additional information, including the lists of the principal Scottish names (vol. ii, pp 422-440), the location of Scottish families in Ireland (vol. ii, pp 518-527) and a detailed lists of Scottish peers, lords, office holders and members of the Scottish parliament, until it was dissolved in 1707 (vol. ii, pp 440-518).

Like most of our titles, Hanna's "The Scotch-Irish, or the Scot in North Britain, North Ireland, and North America" is fully searchable, and researchers with an interest in human migration and in the history of Scotland, Ireland or North America will find this an extremely useful resource and thought provoking source, which will stimulate future study.

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The Scot in Ulster, 1888 The Scot in Ulster, 1888

Ref: IET0046
ISBN: 1-84630-059-2
Number of Pages: 150
File Size: 113 Mb
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Sometimes given the sub title of sketches of the history of the Scottish settlers in Ulster this book was originally published as a series of articles in the Scotsman newspaper in the spring of 1888, which were written by the Edinburgh based journalist John Harrison. Written at a time when Home Rule was becoming increasingly popular this publication attempts to justify the right of the people of Ulster to protest against any separation from the Union with Great Britain.

Harrison traces the history of the Scot in Ulster from the beginning right through the Plantation of Ulster, the Rebellion of 1641, the 1798 Rebellion and beyond the 1801 Act of Union. He emphasises the point that the Scot in Ulster was fundamentally different from the native Irish, that they were in fact two separate races even in 1888. But he hoped that the chasm between the two could be bridged but that would only occur "if they both continue to live in the full communion of that great empire".

This original version also includes the catalogue of the publishers, William Blackwood & sons.

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Dod's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage of Great Britian and Ireland for 1902 Dod's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage of Great Britian and Ireland for 1902

Ref: IE5086
ISBN: 1-84630-283-8
Number of Pages: 1,086
File Size: 60 Mb
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First published in 1902 and republished here is the 62nd edition of Dod's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage of Great Britain and Ireland. Published in London by Sampson Low, Marston & Company, this edition of Dod's Peerage & Baronetage contains nearly 1,100 printed pages and details 'All the Titled Classes' in Britain and Ireland for the year in which it was published and as such is an invaluable biographical companion.

Charles Roger Phipps Dod, the originator of Dod's Peerage & Baronetage was born at Drumlease, Co. Leitrim, in 1793, the son of Roger Dod the vicar of Drumlease by his second marriage to Margaret Phipps. Educated at Trinity College, Dublin, Dod entered King's Inns in Dublin in 1816 with the intention of embarking on a legal career. However, after becoming the part-owner of a provincial newspaper, Dod gave up his legal career, and moved to London in 1818. For the next twenty-three years he was associated with the Times. Under Dod's direction the Times' reporting of parliamentary debates became more accurate and impartial was in large part to Dod's management of the reporters in his charge. Dod succeeded Horace Twiss at the Times as compiler of the summary Parliamentary debates while at the same time contributing to the paper's obituary memoires. It was these experiences that led Dod to issue his first long-lasting reference work, Dod's Parliamentary Companion. First issued in 1832 it recorded the first Parliament to sit after the passing of the Great Reform Act of 1832 and has been published annually ever since and is currently in its 178th edition. Respected as the most accurate, informative and impartial source for information on the Houses of Parliament and the Civil Service and remains the most trusted resource in the political arena.

Dod's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage was first published in 1841 has been revised and published annually since its first issue and is now incorporated into Dod's Parliamentary Companion. This 62nd edition, published in 1902, carried the full tile Dod's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage of Great Britain & Ireland for 1902, including all the Titled Classes. The first part of the publication provides a general dictionary on ten classes of Peers, etc., and in each instance details are provided on their 'titles, parentage, descent, ages, birthplaces, marriages, education, professions, residences, public services, offices' together with other relevant historical, personal and professional details. The classes covered under part 1 include peers, peeresses, bishops, baronets, Scottish judges, the Privy Council and knights of most orders including knights bachelor, which include most of the eminent religious, legal and medical men of the realm. Part two provides biographical details on more than 4,000 first sons and daughters of peers bearing courtesy titles.

Dod's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage of Great Britain & Ireland is a complete reference dictionary for the titled classes as well as many others bearing honours for the year in which it was published and as such must prove to be an invaluable edition to any collection.

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The Crofton Memoirs, 1911 The Crofton Memoirs, 1911

Ref: IET0064
ISBN: 1-84630-083-5
Number of Pages: 515
File Size: 106 Mb
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Crofton memoirs, compiled by Henry Thomas Crofton and published in 1911, provides valuable source material for any researchers interested in either the history of the Crofton family or in the early modern history of the east Connaught region. The book is structured in three parts, the first of which focuses on John Crofton (b. 1540), from Cornhill in London. Crofton was an important figure in late Tudor Ireland. He first arrived in Ireland in 1565, a member of the entourage of the new Lord Deputy, Sir Henry Sidney. The following year Sidney undertook his 'progress' (tour) through Ulster and Connaught, and was again accompanied, it appears, by Crofton. By 1569 Crofton had been appointed to a number of important civil offices, including clerk of Connaught, thus commencing his involvement with that region. In 1571 Crofton secured his first lands in Roscommon, at Moylurge, near Boyle, 'only six years after his arrival in Ireland' (p. 47).

Four years later, in 1575, he resigned his various posts, to be appointed to the important office of escheator general of Ireland. This involved him in two key features of the Tudor policy in Ireland - inquisitions into land tenures and the wardship of minors. Thus, in 1578 Crofton was assigned the wardship of Valentine Blake, which entailed raising the child in English ways, customs and religion (p. 50), and in 1583, he held an inquisition into lands forfeited by the earl of Desmond arising from his defeat during the second Geraldine Rebellion, of 1579 83 (p. 47).

Although the Connaught branch of the Croftons remains the focus of this work, also detailed are the families and the pedigrees of related or associated families. Thus, the Sidney family (including Sir Henry Sidney), the Goodman family (George Goodman was Crofton's brother in law, p. 53) and the Duke family (Crofton married Jane Duke. c. 1565 (pp 53, 61)) all receive detailed treatment. Crofton died in 1610, aged 70, by which time he had built up substantial estates, which remained in Crofton hands until disposed of under the terms of the Ashbourne Land Act of 1885. He also provided estates for his four sons and possessions for his daughters, on their marriage (pp 59, 77).

Part two of the book describes the family's heraldry and part three is dedicated to an examination of the descendants of John Crofton, and details the succession of various branches of the family between Crofton's time and the time of publication of the book. Running to two hundred pages in nine sections, this part details the succession and development of Crofton families originating from John Crofton. Much important detail is provided on families in the Connaught counties of Leitrim, Sligo, Mayo and Roscommon, and branches that had migrated, either within Ireland, or abroad.

Like most of our publications, this publication of Crofton memoirs is fully searchable, and researchers with an interest in the history of the Crofton family, the general east Connaught region or the operation of structures of governance in the Tudor period will find this an extremely readable and interesting account.

This title is a DOWNLOAD. Please click the link on the receipt to initiate the download. If you would prefer a version on CD-ROM to be posted to you, please select the option below. It will cost an additional €6.00 (ex VAT) which includes all postage charges. 



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Lieutenant General Sir F.J. Aylmer, BART, V.C., K.C.B., The Aylmers of Ireland, 1931 Lieutenant General Sir F.J. Aylmer, BART, V.C., K.C.B., The Aylmers of Ireland, 1931

Ref: IE0350
ISBN: 1-84630-561-6

Published in 1931 and written by Lieutenant General Sir Fenton John Aylmer this is one of the most comprehensive family histories published regarding a single family in Ireland. Having conducted large amounts of research covering the family in both England and Ireland Aylmer began his work with his own ancestors, the Aylmers of Ireland, adding to the work that was already published in peerages such as the work of Lodge, Burke and Debrett.

Beginning with the earliest known Aylmers in Ireland, debating whether or not the first Aylmers came over with Strongbow, continuing right up to the 18th Century and some information after that. The volume focuses on four main parts of the family, the Aylmers of Meath, the Aylmers of Donadea and the Aylmers of Ballykenane and Painstown, and the Aylmers of Lyons. There are also chapters on several of the most notable family members, the Chief Justice Sir Gerald Aylmer, Sir Gerald Aylmer 1st Baronet of Donadea and Admiral Matthew, 1st Lord Aylmer of Balrath. There are also several chapter on unidentified Aylmers in the 16th, 17th, 18th Centuries and after. The final three chapters are devoted exclusively to the lands of the Aylmers in Ireland. Accompanying the text are 14 Pedigree lists as well as 19 illustrations. The book concludes with the Roll of Honour of those who died in service during the First World War as well as a 36 page extensive index.

Sir Fenton John Aylmer died in 1935 aged 73, leaving behind a wealth of information gathered during his research in to the Aylmer families of both Ireland and England. His own military career was one of note, he was awarded the Victoria Cross for his part in the capture of the Nilt Fort in India in 1892. He spent the final years of his life working on compiling the research on the Aylmer family.

This volume was kindly lent to the project by Michael Synge. 


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Eneclann CD-ROMs Eneclann CD-ROMs

Ref: enec0000
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Below you will find relevant Eneclann CD-ROMs, which we also supply. Eneclann is a partner in the Archive CD Books Ireland Project, and their CDs are essential resources for genealogists and historians alike. 




Grenham's Irish Surnames: SPECIAL OFFER 50% OFF Grenham's Irish Surnames: SPECIAL OFFER 50% OFF

Ref: ENEC005
ISBN: 0-9537557-5-4

Ireland was one of the first European countries to adopt hereditary surnames. Nine centuries of change, along with our history of immigration, colonisation and linguistic upheaval, have produced an extraordinary legacy: Gaels, Vikings, Normans, Scots, Welsh, English, French Huguenots, German Palatines - all have added to the rich mix of what it means to be Irish, and to the long list of surnames borne by the Irish.

This CD-ROM provides an unparalleled resource for anyone interested in his or her Irish surname. It will satisfy a casual curiosity in coats of arms and surname origins, as well as providing a serious research resource for those with a deeper interest in family and surname origins. It includes:

Details of 26,756 Irish surnames and 104,058 surname variants

8,207 Surname Dictionary entries

The distribution of 2,296 surnames in 1890, as recorded in birth records

Details of the distribution of 377,902 households throughout Ireland 1847-64

Coats of arms for 130 of the most common Irish surnames

An extensive bibliography of Irish family history

Ireland-wide parish maps

Details of the records of 3,782 churches and congregations throughout Ireland, comprising 8,376 sets of records.

In addition, the CD-ROM includes a fully context-sensitive Windows Help file detailing the sources used and providing detailed help at all times, and a user-friendly interface designed to make the search process as easy as possible.

Compiled by Ireland’s foremost genealogical expert, this CD is essential for anyone with an interest in Irish surnames or genealogy.

SPECIAL OFFER: 50% off this title. (RRP EURO 24.65) 


Price:   €12.33 (€15.17 Including VAT at 23%) VAT is only charged on customers in the European Union


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