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George Thomas Stokes, D.D. (Edited by Hugh Jackson Lawlor D.D.), Some Worthies of the Irish Church,  1900 George Thomas Stokes, D.D. (Edited by Hugh Jackson Lawlor D.D.), Some Worthies of the Irish Church, 1900

Ref: IE0113
ISBN: 1-84630-312-5

Originally published in London by Hodder and Stoughton, Some Worthies of the Irish Church was written by George Thomas Stokes, D.D., who by many in Irish ecclesiastical circles, could be viewed as a worthy of the Irish Church, but perhaps not in the same league as the subjects of his lectures.

At the time of writing his lectures on which Some Worthies of the Irish Church are taken, Stokes was, apart from being a practising clergyman - he was vicar of All Saints', Blackrock - was also Professor of Ecclesiastical History at the University of Dublin and Keeper of what is now known simply as Marsh's Library in Dublin and the author of a number of successful histories on the Irish Church, including Ireland and the Celtic Church and Ireland and the Anglo-Norman Church. Published posthumously in 1900, Some Worthies of the Irish Church is based on a series of lectures given by Stokes in the Divinity School of the University of Dublin during the winter of 1897-8 and the impetus for the publication of the lectures as a memorial to Stokes was led by the Guardian.

Some Worthies of the Irish Church contains some 352 printed pages representing the nineteen lectures given by Stokes, which treated upon only a handful of his so-called worthies, namely Richard Lingard, Dudley Loftus, Narcissus Marsh, William King and St. Colman, with and additional lecture on sources of local history. By far the largest portion of the book, some 140 pages and eight lectures, was given over by Stokes to Archbishop William King, who was born in Scotland, according to his own writings in 1650, before being brought to Ireland, where he was educated in Co. Tyrone. In his series of lectures on Archbishop King, Stokes provides an intimate portrait of a man he believed to be the true builder of the modern Church in Ireland, but who had by the time of his lectures been sadly forgotten. The lectures on William King include his early career as Chancellor and Dean of St. Patrick's and as Bishop of Derry, his writings on both ecclesiastical and historical subjects and a lecture on his views and relationships with two of his well-known contemporaries, Boulter and Swift.

An enduring theme of Stokes' lectures is that of 'history' in its broadest sense. Stokes was an ardent antiquarian and local historian, and was keen to reveal the parts his subjects played in both recording the ecclesiastical history which they played a part, but also the role they played as recorders and keepers of the earlier history of the Irish Church in Ireland, which might have long been forgotten without them.

The original publication of Stokes' Lecture Series is fully indexed and annotated by its editor, Hugh Jackson Lawlor, D.D., and is full-searchable on this CD-Rom Republication. Some Worthies of the Irish Church must appeal to those with an interest in the Irish Church during some of its most troubled times as revealed through the portraits of some of its leading figures. 


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Rev. G.T. Stokes, Ireland and the Anglo-Norman Church - A History of Ireland and Irish Christianity from the Anglo-Norman Conquest to the Dawn of the Reformation, 1897 Rev. G.T. Stokes, Ireland and the Anglo-Norman Church - A History of Ireland and Irish Christianity from the Anglo-Norman Conquest to the Dawn of the Reformation, 1897

Ref: IE0103
ISBN: 1-84630-294-3

First published in 1889 and republished here on fully-searchable CD-Rom is the 1897 third edition of George Thomas Stokes' Ireland and the Anglo-Norman Church. Containing some 407 printed pages, the original publication is fully indexed and bears the full title of Ireland and the Anglo-Norman Church: A History of Ireland and Irish Christianity from the Anglo-Norman Invasion to the Dawn of the Reformation and was one of Stokes' last publications before his death in 1898.

Rev. Dr. George Thomas Stokes (1843-1898) is regarded as one of Ireland's earliest professional historians. After studying in Galway, Stokes obtained BA, MA and DD from Trinity College, Dublin, before his ordination and appointment as curate of St. Patrick's, Newry. After his appointment to the Chair of Ecclesiastical History he was also appointed as Librarian of Marsh's Library and was elected as a member of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, becoming a frequent contributor to the Society's prestigious journal. Many of Stokes' lectures as Professor of Ecclesiastical History found their way into book form and one of these series of lectures eventually found its way into the public domain as Ireland and the Anglo-Norman Church.

In his preface to this edition Stokes revealed that this publication was intended to be the companion volume to his earlier Ireland and the Celtic Church, published in 1886. As with much of Stokes' work Ireland and the Anglo-Norman Church has as much, if not more, to do with the secular history of Ireland as it does with the ecclesiastical. Like Ireland and the Celtic Church and Worthies of the Irish Church, Ireland and the Anglo-Norman Church is based on a series of lectures given by Stokes in his capacity of Professor or Ecclesiastical History at Dublin University. This lectures were edited and annotated and published as fifteen chapters, which still bear the title 'lectures'. The first of these details the last years of Ireland independence before the arrival of the Anglo-Normans. It includes the decay of the sept of O'Brien and the rise of the O'Neills and the extent of the Danish Kingdom in Ireland, especially that of Dublin, before the arrival of Strongbow and the Normans in 1172. Between this date and Irish independence a vivid portrait is painted of the turmoil in Ireland created by the intrigues of King Dermot McMurrough and the Geraldine invasion amongst others and the sources that were available to the historian for these events.

Following the Anglo-Norman invasion their follows lectures the Norman organization of Ireland and the institution of such offices of state and government as that of Lord Lieutenant and the Court of the King's Bench. Lectures nine onwards detail the collapse of the Anglo-Norman regime and the troubles experienced during the reign of Henry III, which witnessed both England and Ireland being plunged into states of anarchy, which only ceased after the wars of the Roses and Bruces. Ireland and the Anglo-Norman Church is concluded with the fate of the Celtic Church and its relationship with Ireland's Anglo-Norman overlords.

Ireland and the Anglo-Norman Church is an extremely readable account of Ireland civil and ecclesiastic history written by who many regard as Ireland's first professional historian. 


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John Southerden Burn, The History of Parish Registers in England (also including Scotland, Ireland, the East and West Indies), 1829 John Southerden Burn, The History of Parish Registers in England (also including Scotland, Ireland, the East and West Indies), 1829

Ref: IE5038
ISBN: 1-84630-199-8
Number of Pages: 257
File Size: 229 Mb
Availability: Download or CD
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First published n London in 1829 by Edward Suter and republished here in fully-searchable digital format is John Southerden Burn's 257-page Registrum Ecclesiae Parochialis or The History of the Parish Registers in England, also of The Registers of Scotland, Ireland, The East & West Indies, Foreign Countries, Dissenters, The Fleet, King's Bench, Mint, Royal Chapel, Etc., with Observations on Bishop's Transcripts, and the Provisions of the Act of 52d George III. Cap 146.

Over a period of many years Southerden Burn had collected a miscellany of information from the parish registers her had professionally examined. It was noted that since the establishment of procedures for keeping accurate birth, baptism, marriage, death and burial records during the reign of King Henry VIII, Government had periodically sought to pass legislation for regulating the records kept as was the case in 1812 under Provisions of 52d George III Cap 146, which should have standardised the good keeping and preservation of parochial records. It was, however, lamented that by 1829 provisions laid out in the Act had not been met in two important respects, namely the sufficient details were still not being inserted in parochial records being kept and transcripts of all parish registers were not being made and lodged annually with the Bishop's Archives. The latter point was deemed to be most lamentable if by some disaster the originals were lost or damaged.

At the time of writing Southerden Burn noted that that the first issue, the level of detail kept in parish records was especially woeful, making them largely speaking devoid of interest. This was, however, not always the case, especially in the earliest periods of record keeping, which record 'memoranda of every description', which Southerden Burn wished to illustrate in this publication.

Southerden Burn begins The History of Parish Registers in England by describing from the earliest times - references are made here to biblical records - the origin of parochial records culminating, are far as England was concerned, with the Injunction of Thomas Cromwell in September 1538 instigating the keeping of parochial records as we understand them today shortly after the advent of the Established Church of England. Most parochial records in England hope to trace their origins to this date when there were many more parish churches than there are today. This is followed by the legislation passed through parliament and elsewhere relating to the keeping of parish registers between 1538 and the Act of 1812 and an amendment Bill of 1824. These latter legislative measures set out the standard forms in which parish records were to be kept.

On the state and preservation of parish registers in which many explanations are proffered for large blank spaces in many parochial records as well as many other interesting observations in record keeping in England in general. This is followed by lengthy observations of the many peculiarities that can be witnessed in birth/baptism, marriage, death/burial registers throughout England and Southerden Burn goes into some considerable detail in noting and explaining how these peculiarities arose as well as the plethora of extraneous detail on individuals denoting the culture and customs of particular areas before turning his attention to the parochial records outside of England.

Commenting on the Kirk Session Records of Scotland Southerden Burn noted that of the 850 parishes present in Scotland only 99 were believed to keep regular and correct parish records and of these only but a handful of records pre-dated the start of the eighteenth-century and from these he provides many illustrations of the types of records kept. There follows an analysis of, with the exception of the Religious Society of Friends and the Jewish community, the woeful record keeping for the many dissenting religions present in England. The History of the Parish Registers of England is concluded with a number of chapters on the utility of parochial records in general, general observations and index.

Republished here in fully-searchable digital format, John Southerden Burn's The History of Parish Registers in England presents a thorough critique of the parish registers of England, their origins anomalies and uses and is a must for the contemporary user of parish records in England.

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HMC, Report on Franciscan Manuscripts preserved at the Convent, Merchant's Quay, Dublin, 1906 HMC, Report on Franciscan Manuscripts preserved at the Convent, Merchant's Quay, Dublin, 1906

Ref: IE0044
ISBN: 1-84630-150-5
Number of Pages: 318
File Size: 22 Mb
Availability: Download or CD
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Published in London and Dublin in 1906 from a report to the Houses of Parliament by the Historical Manuscripts Commission, the Report on Franciscan Manuscripts details the manuscripts that had survived from the establishment of the Irish Franciscan College of St. Isadore in Rome especially those detailing communications with its first Guardian, Luke Wadding. These manuscripts have since been known as the 'Wadding Papers'. These manuscripts were transferred from Rome to Dublin in 1872.

The Franciscan Manuscripts were transcribed and edited by G. D. Burtchaell and J. M Rigg and this fully-searchable CD-Rom republication of their work contains some 320 pages, the majority of which does not antedate 1624. By its very nature much of the Franciscan Manuscripts were ecclesiastical in their nature, but this does not mean that they hold little interest for the lay reader in fact the obverse is true. From the date of its foundation and the inception of Luke Wadding, Ireland was gripped by events that followed the counter-reformation and later by war that was also defined by religion. Indeed, much that is of interest in the manuscripts take the form of letters to Luke Wadding concerning the periods 1641 to 1645 and it had been independently shown time again that his correspondents were largely well-informed and accurate in their portrayal of the events taking place in Ireland during this pivotal period of its history.

Chief amongst Wadding's correspondents during the periods 1641 to 1645 were Hugh Bourke, Dr. Edmond Dwyer and Don Jayme Nocher. Although the true identity of the latter remains a mystery, he was a Irishman of learning in both Gaelic and Spanish, was probably a Franciscan and held the confidence of the Spanish Ambassador; it is also of some little note the Don Jayme Nocher communicated with Wadding in cipher as did Dr. Edmund Dwyer, agent to Rome from the Archbishops of Cashel and Tuam. Pope Urban had so little regard for Dwyer that after being captured on his return from Rome to Ireland, the Pope refused to pay the remainder of Dwyer's ransom fee after a Huguenot merchant had paid the majority share. However, it is from Hugh Bourke, Commissary of Irish Friar Minor in Germany and Belgium that Wadding received some of his most accurate news of events from Ireland and England and the level of knowledge of many of the correspondents is quite phenomenal and details many of the personalities of the 1641 rebellion such as the Marquis of Ormond and Owen Roe O'Neill.

This fully-searchable republication of the Historical Manuscripts Commission Report on Franciscan Manuscripts must appeal to anyone with an interest in the 1641 rebellion in Ireland and the communications made to Luke Wadding in Rome during this period.

This title is a DOWNLOAD. Please click the link on the receipt to initiate the download. If you would prefer a version on CD-ROM to be posted to you, please select the option below. It will cost an additional €6.00 (ex VAT) which includes all postage charges. 



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Farrar's Index to Irish Marriages 1771-1812 Farrar's Index to Irish Marriages 1771-1812

Ref: IET0038
ISBN: 1-84630-060-6

This index by Henry Farrar, published in two volumes in 1897, details all the marriage entries in Walker's Hibernian Magazine 1771-1812. There are over 12,000 marriages recorded from a time when few other records of this nature survive. As a consequence it is of exceptional genealogical value, recording the names, addresses and some occupations of the couples, and often the names and details of their parents (principally the fathers of the brides). The dates and places of marriage are also recorded, and occasionally a lot of additional detail for selected marriages. We estimate that around 20,000 names are included in this source. The two volumes also include an Appendix by Sir Arthur Vicars of the births, deaths and marriages recorded in the short-lived magazine Anthologia Hibernica 1793-94. There are around 1,350 records in this section. In total we estimate that the books contain over 22,000 names across 547 pages.

The majority of the information is derived from "The Hibernian magazine: or compendium of entertaining knowledge", a monthly magazine established in 1771 until it ceased in 1812. It was the main general Dublin journal for this period and covered many topics, from news and current affairs to fashion and the arts. As a consequence it was the main publication for the announcement of marriages.

 


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